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Update

02/02/2010

Well I feel a bit pressured by myself to put something on this new site I made for my home.  I unfortunately do not have a lot new to say.

My next album, In the Worship of Monsters, is still in the works.  I have about 3 or 4 songs to finish writing for it that I’ve been neglecting.  See I get excited about sharing music with people and I just can’t afford to pay to get an album mastered and printed right now and it’ll probably be a while before I can afford it.

I am working on getting an mp3 service going so you can pay whatever you want for a song and can go as low as I think 15 cents.  I might have to run the calculation again.  I’m also toying with the idea of some straight digital singles or tracks this way but time will tell.

Decibel has a gig in Austin, TX February 19.  Aside from this I’m shying away from live performances.  They’re a lot of trouble and while the performance is massively rewarding emotionally, they do take a ton of time to plan.  Add that to I really don’t care about playing gigs in Tusla where I live and then it becomes costly.  See non-famous bands don’t get paid much if anything by the venue.  Most of our income comes from merchandise.  That’s why you see bands like Cruxshadows, Ego Likeness, and Bella Morte trying to sell you books, comics, arts, and tons of other stuff besides their album.  There is nothing wrong with that, but its just not the life I want to live.

My new goal in life is to get a job doing soundtracks for video games.  I love video games and I love soundtracks, now its just a matter of finding a way in.  I have some ideas or at least starting points thanks to some suggestions from Joystiq.com but any way it goes it will take time.  On top of that I will undoubtedly have to relocate to achieve this goal, which means eventually selling my house that I just bought under a year ago.  And to avoid the government’s extra fees I can’t sell it  without having owned it for 2 years so I have a bit of a wait.  But in the meantimes I intend to develop myself online and do more research into the industry.  Yes I do love my current job, but its not want I want to do with my life.

Anyway, that’s my story.  Later.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. 02/05/2010 11:03

    Actually, we get payed reasonably well for most shows, particularly in larger markets like LA, NYC, etc. While yes, cd’s have more or less no value, that is not why we sell all of the other things. I, for instance, have a degree in fine art, and made a living as an artist, long before the band ever existed. Donna has always written, same with Andy from Bella. All of the various creative projects feed into each other.

    While the band’s are probably the most public of our various projects, many of us are multidisciplinary, by nature.

    Though obviously having as many unique things to sell as possible does help with the practical expenses of surviving as artists of any kind.

    -Steven

    • 02/05/2010 20:59

      This is a massive surprise on a lot of levels. After working as a sound guy for a while (I’ve actually run sound for you guys 2 or 3 times), I had really come to the conclusion that most of the money that the non-mainstream touring bands made really came from merchandise sales, especially after seeing how little Tulsa promoters can afford to pay the bands. This is definitely some food for thought.

      Where did you originally work on developing a fan base?

      Also, good to hear you guys are still giving it a go.

      • 02/05/2010 23:30

        Well, to be clear it depends on the gig.
        Sometimes you get real money, sometimes you get a cut of door, sometimes you pay to join a large tour, sometimes you join a large tour, and play for merch.

        Regardless being in a band, particularly a touring one is expensive.
        The trick is to be as smart as possible when it comes to every aspect of what you do.
        Controlling merch is a big part of that. Our Ep’s cost us about a two bucks to manufacture, then we sell them for ten. The art has almost no cost averaged out as far as materials go. The more stuff that you can create that has value that cannot be downloaded the better off you are, that includes both the product, the quality of the show, and the overall integrity of what we do, which hopefully makes people want to support us.

        Some shows you get a grand and sell one shirt, some shows, you play for door and do five hundred in product. Some shows you don’t get anything, and you eat all of the costs involved.

        But, again, we have been at this for ten years, it takes a very long time (unless you are lucky enough to just hit on something that resonates across the world) to build up a fan base and business infrastructure to make real money, or even not lose money.

        We started developing our fanbase by playing regionally. We didn’t go out too far, operating under the idea, that if we couldn’t get back to any given market in 6-8 months, it wasn’t worth playing. Eventually that expanded. When we were unsigned, we set up cd release parties with anyone who would do one, and then sent them a ton of free shit, just to get a toehold in those markets.

        Its an expensive way to go, but physical cd’s trumps mp3s every time when it comes to making a impression to people you don’t know. Particularly if there is good packaging. Or rather, in order for that to work, the packaging has to be evocative.

        All that being said, this new album is probably the last one where music will be the focus of our lives. We will still do it, but we ain’t getting any younger, and we do have to look towards the future. But music will and shows will still defiantly be part of our lives even then.

  2. 02/06/2010 10:45

    I appreciate the insightful reply. Its rare an electronic musician will share their inner workings to any measure and you’ve always been very good with my questions (I’ve questioned the hell out of you before back when I was in Axis).

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